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Faculty Online Migration LibGuide: Assessment

This LibGuide is chock full of resources that will help you migrate your courses to an online environment.

Assessment Reporting

PDSA forms that were used in 2019-2020 and earlier have been replaced by a streamlined format starting with Fall, 2020. The newly streamlined process, which is still called PDSA includes the following steps:

Planning is done by establishing your course goals and identifying your summative assessments. Table 1 shows an example of establishing course goals. Tables 2 and 3 show examples of establishing summative assessments. Course goals generally do not change, so you can just copy them from semester to semester. Summative assessments may change if you introduce new assignments or revise your tests, so they may need to be updated each semester. Planning documents should be emailed to dwalcerz@lee.edu

You should prepare a Planning document for each course you teach. The Planning document should contain Table 1 and Table 2 or 3 depending on the type of summative assessment applicable to the course. Planning documents are due about the eighth week of the fall or spring semester and the fourth week of summer I and summer II.

  1. If you are teaching multiple sections of the same course you only need to submit one Planning document for the course.
  2. If you and your colleagues teach a course where you follow a common syllabus with the same summative assessments you can submit one document for all faculty.

Doing is done by teaching your course, assessing your students, and submitting your assessment data to the Office of Institutional Research for analysis. Submit your assessment data at the end of the semester; it is due seven days after grades are due.

  1. If your summative assessments are individually graded assignments (not machine-graded cumulative exams), then your Assessment Data document will be a Word document containing Table 2 and you will include the names and ID’s of the students in your course as well as their scores on the individually graded assignments.
  2. If your assessments are machine-graded cumulative exam(s), then your Assessment Data document will be a Word document containing Table 3 accompanied by an electronic file with the Blackboard cumulative exam(s) or Scantron results or exam results from a third-party vendor, e.g., Pearson MyLabs. If you are using a third-party vendor for your cumulative exams and you do not know how to download exam results, do not panic; the Office of Institutional Research can work with the vendor to extract the data. Just make a note on your Assessment Data document that your exam data is in a system from a third-party vendor and you need support to extract the exam results.

Studying is done by reviewing the analysis that the Office of Institutional Research prepares for you. Convocation week will always include sessions for studying the data together. The question we ask when we are studying the data is: What aspect(s) of my course deserves my attention?

  1. You may feel that the assessment data are not representative of what students have learned because your assessment isn’t measuring what you want it to measure, in which case you may want to focus your attention on designing better assessments.
  2. You may feel that the assessment data do, in fact, show what your students have learned, and you may see a particular content area where your students underperform, in which case you may want to focus on how to increase learning in that content area.
  3. You may feel that student performance overall is acceptable, but it could be improved if you could stimulate more engagement in class discussions, in which case you may want to focus on techniques for development of class discussions.
  4. You may observe that there is a performance gap between White students and Black and Hispanic students, in which case you may want to focus on techniques that address performance gaps such as cultural wealth, asset-based thinking, academic validation, growth mindset, or self-regulation.

Acting is done by engaging in efforts to address the concerns you identified when you were studying the data. Convocation week will always include sessions for studying the data and creating action plans.

  1. Action plans can be experimental. Perhaps you want to try a new technique like flipping the classroom or using live polling to ask questions in class. You are just going to do it and see if it improves an aspect of your course you are concerned about.
  2. Action plans can be investigative. Perhaps you want to learn about how to effectively manage team projects and measure teamwork before actually putting a team project in the syllabus.
  3. Action plans can be analytical. Perhaps you want to study more data to see if there are discernable trends that could direct your attention to what you most want to improve.
  4. Action plans can be individual, department, institutional, or something in between. You may create a plan that is just for you and your courses. You may create a plan, such as developing common assessments, that is shared by faculty who teach the same course. You may create a plan that is departmental, such as reinforcing a particular skill like writing or Excel or multiculturalism in all departmental courses. Or, you may create a plan that is institutional, such as requiring teamwork in all degree and certificate programs.

 

Table 1: Example of establishing course SLOs based on ACGM/WECM goals

COURSE: LMGT 1319

Instructor: Shari Carter

ACGM/WECM Student Learning Outcomes

Course Student Learning Outcomes

1

Learn the introduction level of business and logistics activities. 

1

Learn the introduction level of business and logistics activities. 

Learn to analyze and apply business principles and concepts of logistics functions.

2

Learn to analyze and apply business principles and concepts of logistics functions. 

3

Explore best business theories, practices and apply them to improve business performance. 

2

Explore best business theories, practices and apply them to improve business performance. 

4

Evaluate the use of good decision-making skills to impact company cost, performance, and scheduling.  

3

Evaluate the use of good decision-making skills to impact company cost, performance, and scheduling.  

Explore logistics resources for answering questions and or solving a variety of performance problems. 

5

Explore logistics resources for answering questions and or solving a variety of performance problems. 

6

Apply course material to improve performance with problem solving and developing critical thinking skills in business decision making. 

4

Apply course material to improve performance with problem solving and developing critical thinking skills in business decision making. 

 

Table 2: Example of identifying summative assessments (colored columns) and the SLO that is measured by each summative assessment. This example assumes that the summative assessments are individually graded assignments. See Table 3 for an example where the summative assessments are machine-graded comprehensive tests.

Course: SPCH 1311

Instructor: L Jenkins

Name

ID

SLO 1

Who Am I speech

40 points

SLO 2

Radio Listening project w/ discussion

170 points

SLO 3

Group Persuasive

Speech

200 points

SLO 4

Informative Presentation

200 points

Last, First

XXXXXXXXX

Last, First

XXXXXXXXX

Last, First

XXXXXXXXX

 

Table 3: Example of identifying summative assessments (colored columns) and the SLO that is measured by each summative assessment. This example assumes that the summative assessments are machine-graded exams and specific questions on each exam are aligned with SLOs.

Exam Blueprint

Course: PSYC 2301

Instructor: Nicole Korzetz

Course SLO

U#1 Exam

U#2 Exam

U#3 Exam

SLO-1

Questions on Unit 1 exam that measure SLO 1 to be determined at the end of the semester.

Questions on Unit 2 exam that measure SLO 1 to be determined at the end of the semester.

Questions on Unit 3 exam that measure SLO 1 to be determined at the end of the semester.

SLO-2

(No questions on Unit 1 exam will measure SLO 2)

Questions on Unit 2 exam that measure SLO 2 to be determined at the end of the semester.

Questions on Unit 3 exam that measure SLO 2 to be determined at the end of the semester.

SLO-3

(No questions on Unit 1 exam will measure SLO 3)

(No questions on Unit 2 exam will measure SLO 3)

Questions on Unit 3 exam that measure SLO 3 to be determined at the end of the semester.

Assessment Strategies at Other Institutions

E-journals at Lee College: Pedagogy and Remote Learning

Remote Learning:

Teaching in the Higher Ed Classroom:

Discipline Specific:

Instructor Materials from Publishers

E-books

Databases to search for articles on teaching strategies in higher ed

Suggested search terms:

  • Distance education
  • Online learning
  • Online instruction
  • College teaching
  • Assessment
  • Student evaluation